Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Prevention Of Bacterial Infection

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Using antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection only contributes to antibiotic resistance. That same antibiotic may not work the next time it's needed -- and if you get an infection, it can be much more difficult to treat. It's best to wait and use antibiotics only if a bacterial infection is confirmed.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AJoel Fuhrman, MD, Family Medicine, answered
    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) or cruciferous-derived compounds from green vegetables such as kale, cabbage, collards, and broccoli, plus some non-green vegetables such as cauliflower and turnips, work together to enhance defenses against bacterial infections, especially with the ability of certain bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics. Of particular concern are hospital-contracted (nosocomial) infections, which exhibit antibiotic resistance. Streptococcus pneumoniae, for example, causes approximately 3,000 cases of meningitis, 50,000 cases of bacteremia, 500,000 cases of pneumonia, and nearly 7,000,000 cases of otitis media in the United States, in addition to being a leading cause of mortality. Antibiotic-resistant strains of Streptococcus have emerged and are now becoming widespread in certain communities. ITC compounds from greens have natural antimicrobial effects that can be utilized as an aid to boost natural cellular defenses to enable a heightened state of resistance against these dangerous (drug-resistant) bacteria.

    Plus, these same green vegetable-derived compounds fight against H. pylori (helicobacter pylori). This bacteria is a contributory factors to ulcer disease and is associated with a marked increase in the risk of stomach cancer. The high consumption of cruciferous greens is inhibitory against H. pylori, and when these ITC compounds are tested, they show potential as a novel treatment for this condition. Even though this research is mostly in animals and a limited number of human participants, the point is not that this is the latest and greatest new pill, but that the regular consumption of all these micronutrients in greens builds up a constellation of beneficial health effects that reduce one's chance of contracting infections.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Avoiding close contact with individuals who have contagious illnesses may help reduce the risk of acquiring bacterial infections.

    Practicing good hygiene and regularly washing the hands with soap and water may help reduce the risk of acquiring infections.

    Antibiotics should only be taken when needed. This helps reduce the risk of developing antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the future.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    ALeigh Vinocur, MD, Emergency Medicine, answered
    Dr. Leigh Vinocur - How can I avoid getting sick from bacteria in swimming pools and seawater?

    To keep from getting sick from bacteria while swimming -- first, don't drink the water! says emergency medicine specialist Dr. Leigh Vinocur. Watch the video to learn more about staying healthy around water.


  • 1 Answer
    A
    If your baby gets formula, choose infant formula sold in liquid form, especially when your baby is a newborn or very young. Liquid formulations of infant formula are made to be sterile and should not transmit Cronobacter or other infections if handled properly after opening.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Breastfeeding helps prevent many kinds of infections among infants. Almost no cases of Cronobacter infection (caused by Cronobacter bacteria found naturally in the environment) have been reported among infants who were being exclusively breastfed (meaning, the baby was fed only breast milk and no formula or other foods), and there is no known risk of getting Cronobacter infection through breastfeeding.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Infection control is the key to stopping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) -- a staph infection that is resistant to several common antibiotics -- in health care settings. To protect dental patients like yourself, dental health care workers follow strict infection control practices as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The American Dental Association (ADA) urges all dentists, dental auxiliaries and dental laboratories to employ appropriate infection control procedures, and to keep up-to-date as scientific information leads to improvements in infection control, risk assessment and disease management in oral health care.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AAshley Koff, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Here's how you can help prevent bacterial and yeast infections:

    1. I discuss hydration often and in the summer, when we swim, when we workout, when we play -- hydration (soo much more than 'just drink water') is key.

    2. Good vs bad -- one way to keep the bad at bay is to make sure we have enough good guys …probiotics (good bacteria) and beneficial yeast (sacromyces boulardii) help limit the space available for the bad ones.

    3. Hospitality -- to thrive, the good guys need a good home. Follow the tips for more alkaline choices and limit immune suppressors like sugar and alcohol (I said limit, it doesn't mean totally avoid unless that is you already have an infection in which case avoid).

    4. Spice it up! Most spices have anti-microbial properties meaning they are nature's anti-biotics/anti-yeast/anti-fungals…suddenly the song lyrics "parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme" take on new meaning as they help prevent infections.

    5. Seek medical attention: an infection does need to be treated and it is up to you and your choice of healthcare practitioner to decide what course of action to take.

    6. Dress for success: try wick-away materials for workout clothes and stash a change of underwear in your gym bag; bring a sarong and a change of underwear to the beach and pop into a cabana for a change post-swimming; try to urinate as soon as possible after and wipe front-back following sex.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    An essential part of preventing the spread of infection in the community and at home is proper hygiene. This includes hand-washing and cleaning shared items and surfaces. Antibacterial-containing products have not been proven to prevent the spread of infection better than products that do not contain antibacterial chemicals.

    Although a link between antibacterial chemicals used in personal cleaning products and bacterial resistance has been shown in vitro studies (in a controlled environment), no human health consequence has been demonstrated. More studies examining resistance issues related to these products are needed.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AR. Tom Glass, DDS, Dentistry, answered
    Yes, there is a method of sterilizing your child's band wind musical instrument. The process uses ethylene oxide, a compound used in hospital operating rooms to rapidly sterilize dropped surgical instruments. This compound does not hurt the instrument. Such sterilization should be employed when the instrument is passed from one child to another.