Meniere's Treatment

Meniere's Treatment

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    Iodine: Chronic iodine deficiency can lead to numerous health problems in children and adults, including hearing loss. Auditory disturbances may be present in iodine deficient children, and continuous iodine supplementation may improve the auditory thresholds.

    There have been reports of severe and even fatal reactions to iodine. Avoid iodine-based products if allergic to iodine. Do not use for more than 14 days. Avoid lugol solution and the saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI, PIMA) with high amounts of potassium in the blood, fluid in the lungs, bronchitis, or tuberculosis. Use sodium iodide cautiously with kidney failure. Avoid sodium iodide with gastrointestinal obstruction. Iodine is safe in recommended doses for pregnant or breastfeeding women.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    AHealthwise answered

    Medicines do not cure Ménière's disease. But they can reduce the severity of some symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting and the spinning sensation of vertigo. Also, medicines can help you feel more comfortable during an attack.

    Medicines that may reduce the spinning sensation of vertigo include:

    • Antihistamines, such as dimenhydrinate (for example, Dramamine), diphenhydramine (for example, Benadryl), and diphenhydramine meclizine (for example, BenadrylAntivert).
    • Scopolamine (Transderm Scop), which is a patch placed on the skin behind your ear.
    • Sedatives, such as clonazepam (Klonopin) and diazepam (for example, Valium).
    • Corticosteroids, such as methylprednisolone or prednisone.

    Antiemetic medicines, such as promethazine, may be used to reduce nausea and vomiting that can occur with vertigo.

    Diuretics, such as hydrochlorothiazide (for example, Microzide), and a low-salt diet may be used to reduce excess fluid and prevent future attacks of vertigo.

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    AHealthwise answered

    Surgery for Ménière's disease can cause permanent damage to your hearing. Talk with your doctor about surgical options if repeated attempts at less invasive treatment methods have failed to relieve your symptoms. Surgery may be considered for people with Ménière's disease who:

    • Have persistent or frequent attacks of severe vertigo (a spinning sensation) that do not improve after using medicine.
    • Have symptoms that are so debilitating that it becomes difficult to get through the events of daily life.
    • Are affected in only one ear.

    Surgeries that may be used to treat Ménière's disease include:

    • Endolymphatic sac decompression
    • Endolymphatic shunt
    • Vestibular nerve section
    • Labyrinthectomy
    The goal of surgery is to eliminate the symptoms while keeping as much hearing in the ear as possible. But the most extreme forms of surgery (vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy) always result in complete hearing loss in that ear. The possibility of losing your hearing in the treated ear is a major consideration when you are deciding whether to have surgery to treat Ménière's disease. In some cases, the disease may have already greatly damaged your hearing, which makes the risk of being deaf in that ear less important.

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    Anti-vertigo medications, such as meclizine (Antivert®) may provide temporary relief. Anti-nausea medication is sometimes prescribed, such as prochlorperazine (Compazine®). Anti-anxiety drugs may also be used, such as alprazolam (Xanax®). Anti-vertigo, anti-nausea, and anti-anxiety medications may cause drowsiness. Alprazolam is in a class of drugs called benzodiazepines. These medications may cause physical and psychological addiction.

    Injections with a steroid, such as dexamethasone (Decadron®), may also help control vertigo attacks in some individuals. Although dexamethasone injections may be slightly less effective than gentamicin, dexamethasone is less likely than gentamicin to cause further hearing loss.

    Endolymphatic sac procedures: Endolymphatic sac procedures are surgical procedures that reduce the swelling caused by endolymph (an inner ear fluid) buildup. In endolymphatic sac decompression, some of the bone surrounding the inner ear is removed. In some cases, endolymphatic sac decompression is coupled with the placement of an endolymphatic shunt, a tube that drains excess fluid from the inner ear. Another surgical approach, called a sacculotomy, involves implanting a permanent, tack-like device that allows endolymph to drain out of the inner ear whenever pressure builds up.

    Vestibular neurectomy: A vestibular neurectomy involves cutting the nerve that controls balance (vestibular nerve). When hearing loss is severe or Ménière's syndrome involves intense vertigo, a vestibular neurectomy may be done to surgically destroy the entire inner ear. The individual's other ear then takes over the balance function.

    Rehabilitation: If the individual experiences problems with balance between attacks, they may benefit from vestibular rehabilitation therapy. The goal of this therapy, which may include exercises and activities performed during therapy sessions and at home, is to help the body and brain regain the ability to process information correctly.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

  • 1 Answer
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    Surgery cannot cure Meniere's disease. However, if the vertigo and dizziness that accompanies the disease is so bad that it's incapacitating, and other treatments don't work, there are surgeries that may help. Your doctor may cut the vestibular nerve in your inner ear that leads to the balance center of your brain, or drain fluid out of your inner ear. If you are nearly or completely deaf in the affected ear, your doctor may consider removing the inner ear (a labyrinthectomy). This may control the dizziness, but will cause total deafness in that ear.

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    Meniere's disease cannot be cured at this time. However, sometimes it does go away on its own. Treatment for the disease usually centers on relieving its symptoms and the inner ear fluid imbalance that causes them.

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    Alternative therapies such as hypnosis and acupuncture are not widely recommended for Meniere's disease. However, anxiety and stress can aggravate the symptoms of Meniere's disease, so therapies that reduce stress may help. Your doctor might recommend that you quit smoking, cut caffeine and MSG out of your diet, and control salt intake for the same reason.

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    Medicines cannot cure Meniere's disease, but they may relieve the symptoms. Diuretics may be used to lower the amount of fluid in your ears. Allergy medicine may also help, if allergies are a trigger for the disease.

    Valium and other motion sickness treatments may ease vertigo, dizziness, and nausea, and anti-nausea drugs may also be useful. Injections of steroids or the antibiotic gentamicin into your middle ear may also relieve vertigo, although hearing loss can be a side effect.

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    Meniere's disease cannot be cured, but the symptoms can often be treated. Medications may be taken by mouth to relieve vertigo, dizziness, and nausea. In some cases, drugs may be injected into the ears, or ear surgery may be necessary to ease vertigo.

    A hearing aid may help with hearing loss. Dietary changes may also help. Your doctor may recommend that you control your salt intake and cut out MSG, caffeine and nicotine entirely, as these may aggravate Meniere's disease.

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    The symptoms of Meniere's disease (such as vertigo, deafness, or noise in the ears) can mimic those of other disorders, so it's important to see a doctor to find out exactly what you have. For example, vertigo - a spinning, dizzy feeling - can also be a sign of a brain tumor, stroke, or several other problems.

    Meniere's disease cannot be cured, but your doctor may be able to alleviate your symptoms. Medicine may ease the dizziness, nausea, and ear pressure that occur with Meniere's disease. Hearing aids can also help with hearing loss. If these treatments fail, surgery may help.