Lymphangiomas

Lymphangiomas

About one-quarter of all benign vascular tumors in children are lymphangiomas, which form in the lymphatic system and involve the skin and mucous membranes. They commonly appear in the head, neck, buttocks and trunk and usually contain clear lymph fluid. A cystic hygroma, which forms in the neck, is a larger type of lymphangioma. Unlike cystic hygroma, the majority of lymphangiomas dont interfere with respiration or other bodily functions; but they are removed surgically for cosmetic reasons. About half are seen at birth, and most appear by the time a child reaches age 5.

Recently Answered

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    Lymphangiomatosis can create a multitude of complications. The condition, in which benign tumors grow in the pathways of the lymphatic system, can compromise the normal functioning of the body. All organs can be affected with the lungs and heart usually leading to the most serious complications.

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    Medications are generally used to shrink or eliminate the tumors of the lymphatic system that are associated with lymphangiomatosis. Anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and anti-viral drugs may also be used. Pain relievers can take away the discomfort often associated with the condition.

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    Lymphangiomatosis can affect the body in numerous ways. In general, though, it interferes with the normal functioning of the body due to numerous benign tumors growing in the pathways of the lymphatic system. As these tumors enlarge and spread they can compromise vital organs, bone, or connective tissue.

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    Lymphangiomas, or benign tumors of the lymphatic system, usually appear as soft growths on the skin by the age of one. Current recommendations are to refrain from surgery or laser treatment until at least the age of two, unless there are complications. Some lymphangiomas, by virtue of their location, can hinder eating or breathing. In those cases, immediate treatment may be necessary to ensure a child's proper development. In approximately 15 percent of cases, lymphangiomas disappear without treatment.

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    Lymphangiomas, or tumors of the lymphatic system, can have complications, depending on their location. The face and neck are typically where lymphangiomas develop. In some cases, they interfere with breathing or eating. If the complications are serious enough they can even be fatal, although that rarely occurs.

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    Lymphangiomas are generally a life-long condition. These tumors of the lymphatic system are often present at birth. In the vast majority of cases, symptoms appear within the first year of life. There is no cure for lymphangiomas, which are non-cancerous and usually painless.

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    Your chances of developing lymphangiomas are unlikely. Lymphangiomas are rare tumors of the lymphatic system. They are usually visible as growths on the skin and, if they are not present at birth, appear during the first year of life.

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    Lymphangiomas means that non-cancerous tumors have formed in the body's lymphatic system. These tumors are often visible on the skin in the form of a soft and sometimes discolored growth. Lymphangiomas do not become cancerous and in some cases even disappear without treatment.

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    In the vast majority of cases, lymphangiomas are not life-threatening. The condition is associated with a three percent mortality rate. Lymphangiomas, or benign tumors of the lymphatic system, can be fatal when they are located in the neck or mouth and interfere with breathing.

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    You probably do not have to worry about lymphangiomas. Lymphangiomas are a rare condition that generally affect children within their first year of life. When lymphangiomas, or tumors of the lymphatic system, develop, they are non-cancerous and generally painless.