Kidney Stone Treatment

Kidney Stone Treatment

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    AJayram Krishnan, DO, Urology, answered on behalf of Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
    What Can I Expect after My Kidney Stone Is Removed?
    After a kidney stone is removed, your doctor will perform a series of tests that will help tailor your diet for future prevention, says Jayram Krishnan, DO, a urologist at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he explains what each test analyzes.
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    AJayram Krishnan, DO, Urology, answered on behalf of Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
    How Are Stones Outside of the Kidney Treated?
    Once a stone leaves the kidney, where it might lodge in the ureter determines treatment, says Jayram Krishnan, DO, a urologist at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he explains when ureteroscopy might be needed.
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Stents are inserted to unblock a ureteral stone, often in the setting of emergency for infection or pain. 
     
    For instance if the kidney is infected, a doctor won’t want to perform lithotripsy so they may put in a stent to drain it and then return when the infection has settled. They can also be used to relieve severe pain until lithotripsy can be performed.
     
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Drinking alkaline water is a popular internet remedy for kidney stones but the effects on kidney stones are uncertain. 
     
    Instead we use potassium citrate or sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) to put your kidney in an alkaline state, which can help dissolve uric acid stones or prevent calcium stones.  
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    It is not a good idea to drink vast amounts of dark beer to help pass a kidney stone, although alcohol is a diuretic. It is important to be careful regarding the herbal remedies you see on the Internet.
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    During PCNL to remove a large kidney stone, doctors can advance a larger camera directly into the kidney. Since the procedure provides direct access into the kidney, doctors can use larger instruments to remove larger stones. Most commonly used are an ultrasound  that can grind the stone up and suction it out, or a pneumatic device that operates like a jackhammer to shatter hard stones along with a variety of graspers to remove the pieces through the sheath in your back. The surgeon will usually have all these devices at his or her disposal and will use whatever works best for the type of stone.

    This procedure is often done in the hospital with an overnight stay because it is invasive.
  • 2 Answers
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    AJayram Krishnan, DO, Urology, answered on behalf of Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
    How Are Large Kidney Stones Treated?
    Large kidney stones are treated surgically, says Jayram Krishnan, DO, a urologist at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, is he explains what that surgical procedure involves.
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Lithotripsy -- litho (stone) and tripsy (break) -- is any way of saying “to break a stone”. It can refer to any energy source or procedure that is used to break up a stone. The most common energy sources used today are acoustic shock waves (ESWL), laser energy, and pneumatic energy. 
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    If a kidney stone hasn’t passed, if you’re infected or you’re in horrible pain, the doctor may choose to insert a temporary stent into your kidney. A stent is a temporary means to bypass the obstruction and allow the kidney and any infection to drain. It works the same way a heart stent does, however a urinary stent is only temporary until the stone is removed.
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    AGregory Jack, MD, Urology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Doctors may prescribe anti-inflammatories (NSAID) to help with the pain. The over-the-counter anti-inflammatory that I use is ibuprofen, usually 600 milligrams. For severe colic we use a stronger, injectable NSAID called ketorolac. It’s a very potent anti-inflammatory and will stop the spasms that you’re having with a kidney stone almost within a few minutes.