HPV

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    Each year, HPV causes close to 27,000 cancers, affecting about 17,600 women and 9,300 men. HPV causes nearly all cervical cancers and many cancers of the anus, penis, vagina, vulva, and oropharynx. Every year in the U.S., about 4,000 women die from cervical cancer, even with extensive screening and treatment programs. Most of these cancers could be prevented by HPV vaccine.

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    If you haven't already had your daughter or son vaccinated for the human papillomavirus (HPV), it's not too late. Ask your child's doctor about getting the HPV vaccine. Take advantage of any visit to the doctor -- such as an annual health checkup or physicals for sports, camp or college -- to ask the doctor about what shots your preteens and teens need.

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    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for preteens at ages 11 or 12 years because it works best when the vaccine series is given prior to exposure to HPV infection. Preteens have very little risk of exposure to HPV.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    AHealthyWomen answered
    The human papillomavirus (HPV) test in combination with the Pap test is better at identifying women at risk for developing cervical cancer than the Pap test alone. The HPV test should be done every five years along with Pap test in women ages 30-65. It should also be done every five years in younger women with inconclusive Pap tests. 
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    Under the Affordable Care Act, one of the women’s preventive services that is covered without cost-sharing requirements includes HPV DNA testing. Women who are 30 or older will have access to high­risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing every three years, regardless of pap smear results. Early screening, detection and treatment have been shown to help reduce the prevalence of cervical cancer. 
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    AElizabeth Poynor, MD, Obstetrics & Gynecology, answered
    When should women start being tested for human papillomavirus (HPV)?

    Women over the age of 30 should be screened annually for human papillomavirus (HPV), says Elizabeth Poynor, MD, PhD, a gynecologist-oncologist in New York City. In this video, she explains why you should get the test.


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    Boys and girls should get all three doses of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine when they are 11 or 12 years old. If a teen or young adult (through age 26) has not started or finished the series of three HPV vaccine shots, it's not too late! If it has been a long time since your child got the first or second dose of HPV vaccine, you don’t have to start over -- just get the remaining shot(s) as soon as possible. Make an appointment today to get your child vaccinated.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)

     

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    APaul Hokemeyer, PhD, Marriage/family Therapy, answered

    Once you know you are going to have a sexual relationship with someone, but before you actually do. HPV is a sexually transmitted infection that can be prevented and contained. It's important, therefore, for people who know they're infected to help stop it from spreading to others. The best way to do this is to be honest with potential sexual partners so that responsible decisions can be made about a mature, informed, and consensual sexual act.

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    APaul Hokemeyer, PhD, Marriage/family Therapy, answered

    Tell your partner in an honest and direct way. An example of this is, "I'm very attracted to you and I need to let you know before we get sexually intimate that I have HPV." You don't need to make any excuses or apologize. Most people are afraid of disclosing their HPV status for fear of being rejected or judged in a negative light. If you fall into this category, you should rethink your relationship with your potential sexual partner. The most rewarding sex occurs in a relationship of trust and measured vulnerability. Sex that lacks these elements is transactional in more cases then not and leads to disappointment and regret.

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    AUCLA Health answered
    Initially, Kellie Ernzen Kruger, M.D., internal medicine-pediatrics specialist at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica heard concern from some parents about the potential for their children to receive the wrong message from being given the vaccine. Administration of the vaccine is accompanied by counseling designed to convey what it protects against and what it doesn’t, as well as the other risk factors associated with sex. When all of this is explained, Dr. Kruger says, “most parents are very supportive of giving this to their daughter.”