Hair Coloring

Hair Coloring

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    ADavid Pollock, Cosmetology, answered
    Coloring your hair to hide the gray is a great way to hide the telltale signs of aging. Choose a color that is close to your original color, so it naturally complements your facial tones. If you like, consider highlights or lowlights, since they do not require redoing as often.
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    AYouBeauty answered
    You can lighten your brows to make them appear more subtle, but don’t try bleaching your own brows at home. “They can turn orange,” celebrity brow expert Anastasia Soare told us. “Instead, try semi-permanent hair color in a lighter shade, and leave it on for just one minute. It’s safer to do it again in a few days (if you still want to go lighter).”
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    AYouBeauty answered
    Water fades hair color. In fact, up to 80% of color fade is due to water alone. Your hair absorbs water, and as your hair dries, the dyes drain out with the water. If you’re a staunch everyday washer, try every other day. To stretch out the time between washes, try a dry shampoo on your roots to absorb oil and pump up volume (available at salons or drugstores).
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    AYouBeauty answered
    For locks that are about 20 to 25% gray, use a demi- or semi-permanent hair color that’s closest to your natural tone in order to blend away the grays with minimal damage to the hair. Both types deposit color without ammonia, but the demi-permanent color "uses a stronger concentration of hydrogen peroxide to open up the hair cuticle and inject more color," Perry Romanowski, a cosmetic chemist in Chicago, told us. As a result, demi-permanent color lasts almost twice as long as semi-permanent.  Semi-permanent color delivers a rich, shiny color but fades out in six to 12 shampoos.

    If more than half of your hair is gray, go the permanent color route. Permanent hair color contains ammonia which opens the hair cuticle to allow the color to penetrate.

    Many colorists advise not taking on the challenge of coloring gray hair yourself -- at least not the first time. Keep in mind that if things go haywire as you DIY, the color correction can cost more than a regular salon visit for coloring.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Dr. Oz - grey hair

    There's no way to keep grey away between appointments with your colorist (otherwise, she wouldn't have a job!) But you can hide wayward greys. Learn how by watching this video featuring Louis Licari, celebrity hair stylist and Dr. Oz Show guest.


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    AKeri Peterson, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Keri Peterson - Are hair colors associated with different health conditions?
    Your hair color can impact your physical health; blondes, brunettes and redheads are all susceptible to different health issues. Watch internal medicine specialist Keri Peterson, MD, explain how hair color can predispose you to different conditions.
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    ADiscovery Health answered
    Coloring your hair can cause damage to your scalp if you're allergic to the dye.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Although hair dyes can increase your risk for breakage, you can still have healthy, color-treated hair. Start by carefully following the directions for applying the dye. Don't use the product more than is recommended by the manufacturer. To help protect the health of your hair, experts recommend staying within three shades of your natural color when you dye it. Dying your hair darker rather than lighter is also generally better for your hair. If you dye your hair, you may want to minimize your use of other chemical processes, such as hair permanent waves or relaxers, which can further damage your hair.

    Also minimize your use of blow dryers, flat irons and curling irons because exposure to heat may increase hair damage. Choosing shampoos and conditioners formulated for color-treated hair may also help keep it looking healthy. Consult your dermatologist for other ways to keep your hair healthy when you use hair dye.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    The best hair dye for you may depend on the color change you are looking for. If you want to be able to wash out the color with shampooing, then using a natural dye, such as henna, or a semi-permanent commercial brand product may be best. If you want hair color that won't wash out, look for a permanent hair coloring product.

    No matter what type of hair coloring product you choose, make sure to follow the package directions carefully, wear plastic gloves when applying the dye, and apply it only to the hair on your head, never to your eyebrows or eyelashes.

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also recommends doing a patch test before you apply hair color all over your head, as in some people hair coloring products may cause skin irritation or even allergic reactions. To do a patch test, rub a little bit of the dye on the inside of your elbow or behind your ear and wait two days. If a rash results, do not apply the hair color to your hair. If your skin has no reaction, it is probably safe to use the hair color on your head.
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    Large terminal scalp hair shafts are composed of three distinct zones or parts - the medulla, the cortex, and the cuticle. The cuticle is a protective protein covering constructed in a sort of overlapping scale configuration. The cortex constitutes the majority of the hair shaft and contains the pigmenting that determines the color of the hair. In order to change hair color significantly, one's actual hair color must be neutralized so that the hair can be re-colored with hair dye of a chosen shade. A bleaching solution consists of an alkaline component that opens the cuticle and a bleaching component that irreversibly oxidizes the melanin pigment of the cortex, leaving the hair shaft the whitish to yellowish color of the keratin protein. Artificially coloring the hair is a two-part process consisting of first bleaching the hair, and then re-coloring the bleached hair with a dye. Bleaching and artificial coloring of the hair can be a damaging to the integrity of the hair and should be undertaken with care.