Energy Boosters

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    AJonathan Fialkow, MD, Cardiology, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida
    How Does the Body Get Energy from the Foods We Eat?
    The body gets energy from the foods we eat by converting fats and proteins into energy for muscles, while carbohydrates are converted into sugars. Learn more in my video.
  • 3 Answers
    A
    AJulie Upton, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Most sedentary people lack energy. Make sure you have daily physical activity. Setting a goal of 45 minutes to an hour of exercise most days a week can help with all-day energy.

    People who skip meals often lack energy. People whose meals aren’t balanced -- maybe too high in carbohydrates and snack-type foods -- don’t have long-lasting energy. Always have protein and fiber with your meals and snacks because they slow down the rate of digestion, keeping you fuller longer and keeping energy levels higher or more stable than if you eat junk food. Foods like sodas, candies, and sweets are full of sugar, which is 100% energy but is really short-lived.

    I suggest breakfast, lunch, dinner, and a midmorning and midafternoon snack. A normalized eating pattern is best for maintaining healthy weight and energy levels. Try to eat every three hours, and don’t eat at all after dinner. There’s no reason to fuel up to go to bed.
    View All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    AFrances Largeman-Roth, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    There are other means besides caffeine to feel energized. Here’s a short list:
    • Take a walk. A brisk, ten-minute walk outside can give you perkiness and can help clear the cobwebs.
    • Do some energizing stretches. Reach your arms out to your sides and up over your head while you breathe in deeply. Exhale as you slowly lower your arms. Deep inhalations through your nose, followed by slow exhalations out through your mouth, can help you feel more alert.
    • Hydrate. Drink a glass of sparkling water with a spritz of lemon juice. Dehydration can also make you feel tired.
    • Take a sniff. Naturopathic medicine and aromatherapy practitioners tout that scents can alter your mood. It may not work for you, but it’s worth a try. According to aromatherapy principles, a whiff of a citrus fruit or fresh mint can help you feel more alert, so make sure to inhale the next time you peel an orange, and try adding some fresh mint to your salad or a pitcher of water.
    • Eat a piece of fruit. The natural fruit sugars in fruits like bananas and apples can help lift energy levels.
    • Grab a handful of walnuts. They won’t give you a jolt of energy, but walnuts contain biotin, which helps you metabolize energy from the food you eat.
    View All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    AKate Geagan, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How Can I Boost My Energy Without Coffee?

    It's a cinch to achieve an energy surge without the help of caffeine. In this video, nutritionist Kate Geagan explains easy ways to boost energy.


    View All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Timing of our meals can help boost our energy throughout the day. About 3 to 4 hours after a meal or snack our blood sugar levels will begin to decline. Failing blood sugars make us feel tired, lose our concentration, feel hungry and become very irritable. Eating a well-balanced breakfast in that first hour we are up every morning and then including a meal or snack every few hours thereafter will provide a continuous flow of nutrients into our cells for energy.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    One surefire way to fight your fatigue is to ban the snooze button. You've decided what time you are going to get up every day -- and that does not mean 15 minutes early and snoozing until it's time to get out of bed.

    Ditch the caffeine and find alternative ways to boost your energy, like aromatherapy, exercise, and spicy foods. Aromatherapy can wake up certain parts of the brain, and by inhaling some fresh lemon you can give yourself a lemon lift without spending $5 at Starbucks.

    Another tip is to counteract the energy drain caused by a heavy lunch with a preemptive multivitamin. Vitamins C and E open arteries and increase circulation; heavy meals laden with fat constrict arteries and make you sleepier.

    Boost your energy by taking D-ribose, or ribose, daily. Some research has found that natural D-ribose supplements can significantly improve energy. It's available in pill or powder form and is an essential energy source for your cells.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
    A
    ARealAge answered

    Who wouldn't want to feel more energized and have a smile on their face all day? But short of popping some "happy pills," it seems there's no easy way -- until now. Enter yoga.

    Yep, some simple yoga-style stretches and poses could do the trick. People who did them for five weeks reported a lift in their moods and more spring in their steps.

    A type of yoga that focuses on mood-boosting poses seemed to be particularly helpful in raising spirits in a recent study. In fact, people's moods not only generally improved about halfway through five weeks of doing Iyengar yoga, but posers also felt a bit better after class, too. Talk about instant gratification.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    II doesn't take much sleep loss to produce a lack of energy. Studies show for as little as half an hour of sleep missed you are less alert the next day. Most people need 7 to 8 hours of sleep or more per day to feel at their best. Getting yourself into bed an hour earlier could really make a difference in how fast you get yourself out of that bed in the morning.
    View All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Dr. Oz - pb and banana quesadilla

    When you're low on energy and craving a fast morning pick-me-up, there's no need for a donut. For fewer than 200 calories, you can whip up a sweet and healthy treat that will taste delicious and get you going. In this video, Dr. Oz shows you how.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Energy drinks, or energy boosters, are beverages that contain stimulants, vitamins and/or minerals. Common ingredients include caffeine, guarana extracts, taurine, ginseng, maltodextrin, inositol, carnitine, creatine and Ginkgo biloba. Energy drinks may contain as much as 80mg of caffeine, the equivalent of a cup of coffee. Many also contain high levels of sugar or glucose.

    There are many different types of energy drinks. Some examples include: Adrenaline Rush®, Red Bull®, Sprin®, Monster®, Diesel® and Venom®.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.