Energy Boosters

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    AJonathan Fialkow, MD, Cardiology, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida
    How Does the Body Get Energy from the Foods We Eat?
    The body gets energy from the foods we eat by converting fats and proteins into energy for muscles, while carbohydrates are converted into sugars. Learn more in my video.
  • 3 Answers
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    AKirsi Paalanen, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    Exercise is one of the absolute best ways you can improve your energy levels, as well as helping you out in pretty much every other aspect of your health. Even moderate levels of exercise can have a profound effect on your energy levels. Over time, continued exercise increases your lung capacity, allowing for more oxygen to be delivered to your brain and blood stream, making you feel more awake and alert. Exercise also facilitates circulation, bringing more oxygen to your muscles and allowing for increased functioning throughout your body and heightened energy production.

     

    Another great lifestyle change you can make to have more energy is eating the right kinds of foods, at the right times. They’re not kidding when they say breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Eating a nutritious breakfast within an hour of waking up helps kick-start your metabolism and will keep you going several hours into the day. It’s good to incorporate protein and healthy fats into your breakfast, which will keep you full and focused for longer. Eating five small meals a day is also a good way to keep yourself going, rather than three larger ones. Choosing natural, nutritious foods rather than overly processed junk foods will also help improve energy. Feeding your body right, at the right times, is essential to maintaining healthy energy levels.

     

    Of course, getting enough sleep is perhaps the best way to have more energy. Aside from the obvious side effect of exhaustion, sleep deprivation can lead to weight gain, cognitive deficits, and a whole host of other health complications that you definitely do not want. The average adult requires between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, so make getting adequate sleep as high a priority (if not higher) than whatever you’re staying up late to do, and get some rest!

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    AKirsi Paalanen, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered

    There’s a lot you can do to help mimic the effects of that quick cup of coffee, without actually reaching for a cup of coffee. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to give yourself an energy boost without resorting to caffeine and other stimulants to wake you up. Thirty minutes of exercise, just four times a week, has proven to increase energy levels drastically after just six weeks. Exercise helps improve your lung capacity over time, allowing for more oxygen to reach your brain and muscles, waking you up and facilitating the production of energy in cells throughout your body. In the short term, increased heart rate and heightened blood flow from exercises as simple as taking a walk around the office instead of grabbing a cup of coffee can help you feel more energized. And exercise can be very simply incorporated into a busy lifestyle. Try going for a short walk during your lunch break, getting off the bus or subway a stop sooner than you normally would and walking a few extra blocks, or just doing some jumping jacks when you first wake up in the morning to get your heart pumping.

    Eating healthy is also ideal for keeping your energy levels up. Eating nutritious, all natural meals will give your body the essential nutrients it needs to function at its best. Eating a healthy breakfast within an hour of waking up will kick-start your metabolism and keep you feeling energized for several hours into the day. Incorporating protein and healthy fats into your breakfast is especially important for getting your energy kick-started in the morning. Whole-grain foods and healthy sources of protein like Greek yogurt, cage-free eggs, and grass-fed beef are all excellent energy-boosting foods to incorporate into your diet.

    Staying hydrated is another important way to keep your energy levels up. Water is absolutely essential for maintaining our metabolisms and keeping our energy levels up. Dehydration, even when minor, can make you feel sluggish, think foggily, and cause headaches. Drinking a glass or two of water will help your body keep your metabolism going and keep you feeling at your best.

    Most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep a night, so make sure you make getting enough sleep a top priority in your life!

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Aging is the primary reason why your body feels depleted of energy. Add to that the boatload of daily tasks most of us face -- work, household chores, childrearing -- and it’s no wonder you’re tuckered out. The supplement astragalus can help keep you going. This root, used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries, contains a special chemical that research has shown may actually help slow the aging process. This chemical activates the enzyme telomerase, which works on a cellular level to protect DNA from breaking down, thus warding off exhaustion and a host of other age-related symptoms and diseases.

    Take 200 mg of astragalus twice a day -- in the morning and at night. You’ll start to feel the difference right away.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 2 Answers
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    AKate Geagan, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How Can I Boost My Energy Without Coffee?

    It's a cinch to achieve an energy surge without the help of caffeine. In this video, nutritionist Kate Geagan explains easy ways to boost energy.


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    Timing of our meals can help boost our energy throughout the day. About 3 to 4 hours after a meal or snack our blood sugar levels will begin to decline. Failing blood sugars make us feel tired, lose our concentration, feel hungry and become very irritable. Eating a well-balanced breakfast in that first hour we are up every morning and then including a meal or snack every few hours thereafter will provide a continuous flow of nutrients into our cells for energy.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    One surefire way to fight your fatigue is to ban the snooze button. You've decided what time you are going to get up every day -- and that does not mean 15 minutes early and snoozing until it's time to get out of bed.

    Ditch the caffeine and find alternative ways to boost your energy, like aromatherapy, exercise, and spicy foods. Aromatherapy can wake up certain parts of the brain, and by inhaling some fresh lemon you can give yourself a lemon lift without spending $5 at Starbucks.

    Another tip is to counteract the energy drain caused by a heavy lunch with a preemptive multivitamin. Vitamins C and E open arteries and increase circulation; heavy meals laden with fat constrict arteries and make you sleepier.

    Boost your energy by taking D-ribose, or ribose, daily. Some research has found that natural D-ribose supplements can significantly improve energy. It's available in pill or powder form and is an essential energy source for your cells.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    ARealAge answered

    Who wouldn't want to feel more energized and have a smile on their face all day? But short of popping some "happy pills," it seems there's no easy way -- until now. Enter yoga.

    Yep, some simple yoga-style stretches and poses could do the trick. People who did them for five weeks reported a lift in their moods and more spring in their steps.

    A type of yoga that focuses on mood-boosting poses seemed to be particularly helpful in raising spirits in a recent study. In fact, people's moods not only generally improved about halfway through five weeks of doing Iyengar yoga, but posers also felt a bit better after class, too. Talk about instant gratification.

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    ARealAge answered

    Sleep loss is a major energy drain. Our bodies and brains need six to nine hours of sleep to restore good brain-cell functioning (i.e., the ability to perform physically as well as mentally, since both coordination and thinking require those brain cells to work well). Getting on a regular bedtime schedule will help set your internal clock so your body knows when to sleep and when to wake.

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  • 1 Answer
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Dr. Oz - pb and banana quesadilla

    When you're low on energy and craving a fast morning pick-me-up, there's no need for a donut. For fewer than 200 calories, you can whip up a sweet and healthy treat that will taste delicious and get you going. In this video, Dr. Oz shows you how.