Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic Imaging

Diagnostic imaging includes ultrasounds, X-rays, CT scans and MRIs. These create images of different parts of the body and aid in diagnosing diseases and conditions allowing for a course of treatment to be prescribed.
 

Recently Answered

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    AStephen Kee, MD, Vascular & Interventional Radiology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    The radiation risk from a scan of your aorta is extremely small. There have been major advances in computed tomography (CT) scanning techniques in the last couple of years that have reduced the radiation dose to very small amounts. Doctors can also perform follow-up scans in certain people using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which use no radiation.
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    AStephen Kee, MD, Vascular & Interventional Radiology, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    To have aortic imaging performed takes between 15 and 30 minutes. Of this time, only about five minutes is spent doing the actual scanning. This is because of advances in modern technology. In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are done instead of computed tomography (CT), depending on the particular disease with which you present.

    MRI scanners take slightly longer than CT scanners, but again, your entire visit should be less than half an hour.
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    APhilip Lisagor, MD, Thoracic Surgery (Cardiothoracic Vascular), answered on behalf of The Rest of Your Life (ROYL)
    Imaging/radiology compliance for a medical condition can be monitored. Imaging orders can be stored in the "cloud" online, and reminders about time, place and diet can be sent as text messages, voice mails or email. Failure to appear at the imaging office can be noted and a follow up call from the medical office or the imaging office can be made.
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    Fistulography is an internal diagnostic imaging technique performed by an interventional radiologist to determine characteristics of a fistula. This imaging technique can give interventional radiologists information about whether a foreign body or inflammation is present in order to determine proper care.
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    Radiologists harness the power of X-rays, which penetrate the body, in order to create images of the internal structures of organs, bones and tissues. Interventional radiologists go a step further to use these images to guide minimally invasive procedures to treat a wide range of diseases and injuries.
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    AIntermountain Registered Dietitians, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of Intermountain Healthcare
    Your baby may have occasional imaging studies while she is in the NICU. Imaging procedures allow your doctor to track your baby’s progress and be aware of any special conditions that may be present.
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    The Society of Interventional Radiology is a national organization of doctors, scientists and allied health professionals. It is dedicated to improving public health through disease management and minimally invasive, image-guided therapeutic interventions.
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    ASecondsCount.org answered
     The following questions can help you talk to your physician about having optical coherence tomography (OCT).
    • What symptoms or test results indicated that OCT in conjunction with coronary angiography might be helpful?
    • What are the potential benefits for me of OCT?
    • What are my individual risks associated with undergoing OCT?
    • What happens next if OCT identifies a problem with one of my blood vessels?
    • Will I have limitations after the procedure?
    • Will I need to have someone who can drive me home?
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    ASecondsCount.org answered
    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was only recently approved for use in the United States, but its use in Europe has demonstrated minimal risk for patients. Very rarely, OCT can cause complications such as arrhythmia (abnormal heartbeat) or blockage, dissection or spasm of the artery. The test on its own does not use x-ray technology and therefore does not present radiation risks. However, OCT is always performed in conjunction with another imaging test called a coronary angiogram. Therefore, the risks associated with having an angiogram will apply here.
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    ASecondsCount.org answered
    Many people are already familiar with ultrasound, which uses sound waves to create images of internal structures in the body. OCT works similarly to ultrasound but uses infrared light instead of sound waves. In the case of OCT for cardiovascular procedures, light is emitted from a catheter that is temporarily placed in a patient’s blood vessel. The light that bounces back and is collected from the catheter provides highly detailed images of the interior of the blood vessel.

    For an OCT test, a catheter is inserted through a puncture site in the skin and threaded over a guide wire to the area of interest within the blood vessel. The light that bounces back is collected by the catheter and converted on a computer to images of the blood vessel wall.