Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections
Bacterial infections like typhoid, strep throat and some sexually transmitted diseases are infections caused by different types of bacteria. These infections are often treated with doctor-prescribed antibiotics. Either viruses or bacteria can cause infections, so it’s important to get examined by a doctor to make sure you’re prescribed the correct medication.

Recently Answered

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    AScripps Health answered
    Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection that can lead to serious and often deadly illnesses including pneumonia, meningitis and blood infections. Annually, pneumococcal meningitis and blood infections kill thousands of adults, and up to 175,000 people are hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia. People ages 65 and older have a higher risk of contracting pneumococcal disease and developing serious illness. 
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    Group B strep (GBS) bacteria can come and go naturally in the body. If you have the bacteria in your body when you go into labor, they can spread to your baby during labor. Carrying GBS bacteria does not mean that a person is not clean, and it does not mean that she has a sexually transmitted disease. The bacteria are not spread from food, sex, water or anything that a woman might have come into contact with.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    A woman should ask her doctor or nurse for a group B strep (GBS) test when she is 35 to 37 weeks pregnant. The test is an easy swab of the vagina and rectum that should not hurt.

    Each time a woman is pregnant, she needs to be tested for GBS. It doesn't matter if she did or did not have this type of bacteria before; each pregnancy is different.The only time you don't need the test and will automatically be recommended antibiotics during labor is if you've delivered a previous baby with early-onset GBS disease, or if the bacteria were found in your urine at any time during this pregnancy.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    AUCLA Health answered
    Tetanus infections are rare but are associated with a high death rate. More than half -- 60% -- of tetanus infections are in people 60 years or older. Older adults who have never been vaccinated should receive two tetanus shots, one to two months apart, followed by a third shot six to 12 months later. After that, tetanus booster shots should be given about every 10 years.
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    ARobin Miller, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Is there going to be a simple way to detect lung infections, such as pneumonia and TB?

    There are breath tests that can detect the chemical finger print in different bacteria that have been found in mice. Watch this video with Robin Miller, MD as she talks about where we are headed with these tests in the future.

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    Some studies show that homeopathy may help treat vaginal infections called recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). These results must be confirmed in more studies.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2014 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    AHealthCorps answered

    Some of us engage in counter-intuitive behaviors that may be unwittingly fueling more frequent illnesses. You may be eating healthier fare, which is helping your waistline and health profile in one way, but the manner in which you prepare the food or actually consume the food may be putting you, or others, at risk.

    Licking the spoon while cooking or preparing can mean that you transfer your own germs into the recipe. If you are cooking higher temperature recipes, like stirring a soup or chili, the heat may kill off most of the germs. But if you are licking the spoon as you create a marinade or dressing, the germs may multiply in your refrigerator. Obviously, it’s well known that licking the spoon that is mixing raw batter puts you at risk of certain food borne pathogens from the egg or other raw ingredients.

    Double dipping is another opportunity for people to share germs. When you and others bite off a piece of the food being dipped, and then dip again and again, your germs are mixing in with the food. Why not create small individual bowls or cups of dips for people to grab, and then just offer platters of crudités or whatever else you are dipping?

    It dropped on the floor. There are different timing methods for deciding whether an item that has fallen and hit the ground is still safe to eat, but fallen food can pick up salmonella from the floor in a flash. Drop the five second rule and the food that falls on the floor into the closest garbage receptacle.

    Eating food after the expired date on the package can not only affect the taste of the food or how it behaves as an ingredient in a recipe, but also the germ count or mold growth in the food. Raw meat, chicken, turkey, fish, and dairy or creamy products should be tossed once they pass expiration date.

    Some other not-so-healthy habits include: Not washing your hands before food prep, eating or in between handling different types of foods, not using a thermometer when cooking meat or fish, using dirty sponges to wipe countertops dirtied during preparation, and using a single cutting board for many different food items during the preparation.

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Can Using a Reusable Shopping Bag Make Me Sick?
    If you've had your reusable shopping bag for a while, there's a good chance it's holding a lot more than your groceries. In this video, Dr. Oz explains how to take the ewww out of reusable bags. 
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    AMichael Roizen, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Belly bugs making you fat? No, it's not a crazy excuse.

    There's some lab evidence that certain tummy microbes can "infect" you with flab. Researchers have found that mice who lack a certain protein are about 15% heavier than other mice and have more of an intestinal bug that causes calories to be stored as fat. They also have higher bodywide inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Worse, they have metabolic syndrome, which in humans is characterized by belly fat, high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and high LDL cholesterol (the bad kind).

    Before you blame your belly bulge entirely on tummy bugs, consider this: You might be encouraging those fat-boosting microbes by eating sugary foods. Don't snort. It's easy to overdo the sweet carbs that microbes love, while still eating low-cal. One meal-replacement bar we saw had only 180 calories but more than 3 teaspoons of sugar!

    To nix those bad fat-storing bugs, try cutting back on sugar and/or taking a probiotic supplement of good-guy bacteria. These supplements have bacteria tough enough to survive your stomach acid and replace the bad guys.

    If cutting back on sugar and taking probiotics fail, ask your doc if you can try a short course of Flagyl, and then take the probiotics. Flagyl does have side effects, so taking it should not be your first choice.

    Yogurt can also help.