Allergies Symptoms

Allergies Symptoms

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    AManuel Torres, MD, Family Medicine, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida
    Summer is definitely the season for mosquitoes. You need to know when you have an insect bite, what is a normal bite and what is not. A red dot that stings, itches, and goes away in 24 to 48 hours is a normal and typical reaction. An atypical reaction is when perhaps the bite stays red for longer than normal, emits fluid, or when there’s a rash (urticaria), or when there is swelling, or when there is perhaps a systemic reaction.
    When there is truly an allergic reaction, a patient may have a systemic effect, such as difficulty breathing, or hives outside the area of ​​the bite. Those are signs and symptoms of a reaction that’s out of the ordinary and more aggressive. And it would require emergency treatment.
     
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    AClifford Bassett, Allergy & Immunology, answered
    What facial markers can indicate that I have allergies?

    Facial markers that can indicate that you have allergies include allergic shiners (puffiness under eyelids), lines in the lower eyelid and a distinctive crease in your nose from rubbing. Watch allergist Clifford Bassett, MD, explain these symptoms.


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    AClifford Bassett, Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Here are a few practical tips to help prevent allergy symptoms that affect your eyes and eyelids:
    • Lids off: Gently irrigate your eyelids (while your eyes are closed) with a mild, tear-free "baby" shampoo to remove excess allergens and pollutants which may have accumulated. Check with your provider (especially if you wear contact lenses or have other eye problems) to learn whether anti-allergy eye and/or moisturizing drops may also be helpful and safe.
    • Block your eyes: Wear sunglasses to block pollens from entering and getting into your eyes.
    • Wash wisely: Rinse off your eyeglasses and shower and shampoo your hair every night to remove allergy causing pollens that collect during the day.
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    ARealAge answered
    A healthy diet won't cure you of your nasal allergy symptoms. But exciting new research suggests that certain foods could have the potential to help minimize them. Some foods have natural inflammation-dulling powers, which could be a boon to people suffering from allergies. Allergy symptoms are very much stoked by inflammatory responses. Check out these five foods that might help you breathe easier by quelling inflammation:
    • Salmon: Fatty coldwater fish like salmon are packed with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two super-healthful omega-3 fatty acids that may reduce the risk of allergies. Trout and tuna are good sources, too. If you're not a fan of fish, opt for nuts and seeds instead. They contain alpha-linolenic acid, another type of omega-3 fatty acid.
    • Grape juice: Grape juice is a good source of resveratrol, an antioxidant compound that seemed to reduce asthma inflammation in animal studies. Red wine is an even richer source of resveratrol, but keep in mind that alcohol may make nasal allergy symptoms worse for some people. Snacking on red grapes, blueberries and peanuts is another way to get more resveratrol into your diet.
    • Beans: Legumes are an extra-healthful source of protein. Beans are loaded with folate. In a study, this B vitamin appeared to reduce the intensity of immune system reactions to common allergens. And using beans in place of red meat may do your allergies even more favors. Research shows that red meat may enhance inflammation, so cutting back could be good news for your symptoms.
    • Apples: One a day just might help keep your allergy symptoms away. It's the quercetin in apples that may do the trick. Quercetin is a flavonoid thought to curb the production of histamine and help cool inflammation -- two culprits that play a role in allergic responses.
    • Yogurt: Add the low-fat variety of this creamy dairy food to your antiallergy menu. Because yogurt contains loads of probiotics -- those good-for-your-gut bacteria. In a study, probiotics lowered levels of an immune substance known to fire up allergy symptoms.
    • Carrots: A colorful diet is a healthful diet. Some studies suggest that brightly hued orange, yellow and red produce may help with allergies because they're brimming with cartoneoids -- compounds thought to have an allergy-quelling effect.
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    ARealAge answered
    You can't control your allergies with a single approach. You've got to use every symptom-soothing tool you can. You also need to be consistent in your efforts and willing to explore new treatment options. Most of all, you need to have a step-by-step, strategic plan that keeps you organized and on track, so you can finally take control of your allergy symptoms. Use the following steps to lay the groundwork for your own, personalized allergy-control plan:
    • Partner with your doctor. Solid allergy relief won't come from a single visit to your doctor. Only a long-term relationship with your doctor will do -- one in which you proactively track and share your symptoms, ask the right questions and follow up if you're not getting the relief you need.
    • Get allergy-tested -- even if you've been tested before. Your allergy triggers can change with time.
    • Avoid your triggers. It's impossible to avoid all your triggers, but you should try. Minimizing exposure is the best way to prevent symptoms from flaring up.
    • Follow your medication plan. That includes sticking with any over-the-counter or prescription medications for as long as your doctor recommends. Combine your allergy medications with other sinus-soothing steps to speed your relief.
    • Live a healthy lifestyle. Kick bad habits, such as smoking, drinking too much alcohol or eating inflammation-inducing junk food.
    • Don't forget the TLC. Saline sprays, neti pots, humidifiers and other self-care remedies provide extra layers of allergy-symptom relief, so don't skip this step.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Dr. Oz - puffy eyes

    If allergies are making your eyes puffy, forget the concealers and the foundation -- it's more effective to wipe away the pollen that's causing the problem, says allergy specialist and Dr. Oz Show guest Clifford Bassett. In this video, Dr. Bassett tells Dr. Oz about a product that makes it easy.


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    ARealAge answered
    Symptoms of seasonal allergies include:
    • Runny nose (rhinorrhea)
    • Bouts of sneezing
    • Stuffy nose (congestion)
    • Itchy nose
    • Itchy, watery eyes
    • Dark circles under the eyes (allergic shiners)
    • Itchy palate or throat
    • Ear fullness and popping
    • Pressure in the sinus cavities on either side of the nose and above the eyes

    Allergy symptoms may also lead to fatigue, weakness, and disturbed sleep and can significantly affect well-being.

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    For the most part, morning throat clearing can be due to different causes, one of them being allergies. It could also be due to postnasal drainage, causing accumulation of mucus to the back of the throat and irritating the cough reflex. For the most part, postnasal drainage can also be due to allergies.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Pull down your lower eyelid and look in the mirror. If you notice little bumps inside the eyelid that look like cobblestones, it's a telltale sign of allergies. Some of the most common culprits are dust, pet dander, and mold. To combat allergies, try using a HEPA filter in your home and keeping your beloved pooches and kitties out of your bedroom -- or, at least, off the bed.
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    APaul Ehrlich, Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is the main antibody seen in allergic disease. Its primary role is thought to be defending against parasites. Levels are often checked to determine the degree of allergy or atopy a patient has. Elevated levels often correlate with severe eczema.