Our Mission

HealthyWomen is the nation's leading nonprofit health information source for women. Our mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families.

For 25 years, HealthyWomen has been providing unbiased, original health information, reviewed and vetted by leading medical experts -- earning the trust of consumers, health care providers, nonprofit and corporate partners, and the media. In July our website HealthyWomen.org was selected to ForbesWoman’s "Top 100 Websites for Women" for the third consecutive year.

In addition to our site, HealthyWomen produces print publications for health care providers, the annual WomenTALK® survey addressing current trends in women’s health, as well as public health education campaigns designed to raise awareness of conditions most affecting women.

Activity

  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Obesity, with its associated unhealthy dietary habits and low level of physical activity, is the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States and results in an estimated $117 billion in health care costs each year. Overweight people are more likely to have high blood pressure and...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen has posted a blog entry:
    Know how to use sunscreen properly: use broad-spectrum with SPF 30 or more and know how much to use and how often to apply. Read more.Full Post
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen has posted a blog entry:
    A Vanguard Communications survey looked at online physician reviews and ranked cities by how happy people are with their doctors. View the results.Full Post
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen has posted a blog entry:
    This workout from Cori Ann Lentz at Crunch Fitness uses your own body to create a tight butt, toned thighs and nothing but sleek, toned muscle from...Full Post
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    If you notice your joints creaking a little and not moving as smoothly as they once did, you may want to talk to your healthcare provider about osteoarthritis. As you age, cartilage -- the shock-absorbing tissue that cushions our joints -- can start to break down over time, causing increased stress...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    You're more likely to develop osteoarthritis if you:
    • Are middle-aged or older
    • Have a family member with osteoarthritis
    • Suffered a previous serious joint injury or infection
    • Are overweight
    • Regularly overuse a joint (people with jobs that involve repetitive knee bending are more likely
    ...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Most people don't wake up one day and suddenly have symptoms of osteoarthritis. Instead, the signs usually come on more gradually. At first, you may start to notice that your joints, such as your knees, feel stiff when you get out of bed in the morning or after you sit for a long time. You may have trouble...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    If you suspect you have osteoarthritis, it's important to talk with your healthcare provider about your symptoms. If you are diagnosed with osteoarthritis, it's important to explore the full range of treatment options. These options can help manage the symptoms associated with the disease. It's also...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    While there is no cure for osteoarthritis, there are numerous effective options to help manage the symptoms associated with the disease. Exercise, weight management, medications and other therapies all can help relieve the joint pain caused by osteoarthritis. Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Osteoarthritis may progress differently in different people. In most cases, it develops slowly over time, but it can worsen rapidly in severe cases. It can also remain stable for many years without progression. In some people, osteoarthritis is merely a mild inconvenience; in others, it causes extreme...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Osteoarthritis is treatable, in many cases by exercise and a healthy diet -- things we should be doing anyway for optimum health. Treatment usually involves a combination of therapies. The management options for osteoarthritis include the following:
    • Maintaining a healthy weight
    • Exercising r
    ...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    It is important to maintain a healthy weight if you have osteoarthritis. Losing just one pound of body weight takes four pounds of pressure off your knee joints, so weight loss benefits quickly add up. Plus, inflammatory chemicals made by fatty tissue may be part of the cause of osteoarthritis. As a...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Contrary to conventional wisdom, using a joint with arthritis may not lead to more damage. In fact, the opposite may be true. Not only does regular exercise help you maintain a healthy weight, it builds muscle, and strong muscles can protect your joints. Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Regular exercise is an important component of the osteoarthritis treatment plan. Not only does regular exercise help you maintain a healthy weight, but it builds muscle -- and strong muscles can protect your joints. Exercise also improves mood, increases flexibility, stimulates blood flow and reduces...Read More
  • HealthyWomen
    HealthyWomen answered:
    Consistent exercise is good for joints, even though it may cause some occasional muscle or joint pain. If you have pain that lasts more than a couple hours, reduce the intensity of your workout or take a day off. Talk to your doctor or physical therapist about which activities are best for you. Read More