Colgate

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For answers to your oral care questions and world-class products you can trust for your family, Colgate offers over one hundred years experience in the dental care field and a global team of top oral care professionals. Dr. William DeVizio, a licensed dentist and Colgate-Palmolive Vice-President for Dental Clinical Research, serves as your personal oral health expert on Sharecare.

Activity

  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    If your teeth are prone to cavities, you should be especially vigilant in thoroughly brushing your teeth twice daily with fluoride toothpaste for at least two minutes and flossing daily. Fluoride mouthwash is another treatment that helps maintain healthy, strong enamel to withstand bacterial acids....Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Brushing your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste cleans the teeth and removes food, debris, and bacteria that can lead to tooth decay. Regular teeth brushing removes plaque, a film that sticks to the teeth and gumline and can result in gum disease (gingivitis) if not removed. Also brushing...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Plaque begins to form on the teeth immediately after brushing. When this plaque is not removed regularly and effectively, it can build up and harden, becoming tartar. Plaque forms on teeth regardless of the foods eaten, but eating foods high in sugar or starch contributes to the formation of plaque....Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    It’s easy to prevent plaque and tartar. You simply have to brush and floss your teeth regularly and effectively. It is also important to brush and floss correctly. Most dentists recommend brushing at least twice a day for at least two minutes. Make sure you clean each tooth thoroughly and use toothpaste...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Poor oral hygiene is the main risk factor for developing plaque and tartar on teeth. Since plaque forms continually on teeth, it must be removed on a regular basis to avoid oral disease such as cavities and gum disease, as well as tartar formation. Eating foods high in sugar and starch may also i...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Plaque is the leading cause of tooth decay and gingivitis. If you allow it to remain on your teeth you could end up with a mouth full of cavities, bleeding gums, and very bad breath. On top of that, if you allow it to harden into tartar, you could end up with stained teeth. Simply brushing and flossing...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Flossing is necessary to keep teeth and gums healthy. Dental floss works to reach places between teeth that a tooth brush cannot reach. Flossing daily helps to remove deposits of food particles and bacteria that can lead to plaque and tartar buildup. Plaque is a thin colorless layer of bacteria that forms...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    We get cavities in teeth from a substance in the mouth called plaque, which sticks to teeth and contains acid-producing bacteria that can cause tooth decay and a cavity or hole in the tooth. When we eat sugary or starchy foods, acids are produced that attack and break down the enamel or protective...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:

    Gingivitis is the earliest form of periodontal disease; it is an inflammatory response to bacterial plaque. Clinically the gingival (gum) appears red, swollen and bleeds easily. It is reversible if plaque is removed effectively by   toothbrushing. If gingivitis remains untreated the inflammation spreads

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  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Gingivitis does not affect women differently than men, but the hormonal fluctuations associated with pregnancy and menopause increase gingivitis risk for women. Pregnant women may find that using an antiseptic mouthwash or rinsing with salt water after they brush may help their symptoms. Postmenopausal...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:

    It is not clear whether pregnant women get more cavities than anyone else. But pregnant women who crave sugary foods and give in to those temptations have a higher risk for developing cavities. Some pregnant women may be too preoccupied to practice routine oral care, and some may not know that they

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  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:

    This is simply not true. While the developing fetus does in fact need calcium, protein, and other nutrients, the fetus does not "cannibalize" the mother's teeth. Some calcium might be taken from bone elsewhere in her body but there is no evidence that teeth are affected. Good oral health for you

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  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    Tooth decay and gum disease are the most common oral health problems. Because bacteria live in the mouth, everyone is at risk of cavities and tooth decay. Mouth germs use sugar from the food you eat to make acids that destroy the enamel or outer layer of the teeth. Stagnant saliva, food debris, b...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    You can take better care of your teeth by brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and a soft-bristled toothbrush. It's also important to floss your teeth daily. To help prevent cavities and tooth decay, limit your consumption of sugary foods and snacks. If you smoke, stop. Smoking can increase...Read More
  • De Vizio, DMD
    De Vizio, DMD of Colgate answered:
    A food's pH level indicates how acidic or alkaline (non-acidic) it is. The lower the pH, the more acidic the food. Some research indicates that a diet emphasizing foods and drinks with low pH levels can contribute to the erosion of tooth enamel. Foods and drinks with a low pH include lemons, other...Read More